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Botswana

 

 

 

 

 

 

     
   

The History of Botswanian Cinema from 1907 to the Present Day

     
     
  1907  
     
    – The country's first film is shot by cameramen working for British-based American Charles Urban travelling up the Bechaunaland railway to Victoria Falls.   Their film is soon followed by ones from ethnographer Rudolf Poch which are reputed to be partly in colour and with synchronised sound. [MORE] [ADD]
     
     
     
  1910  
     
    - The country's third film is made by bioscope operators for the South African Railways and Harbours and the Coliseum Cinema.   The films are phantom rides filmed from the front of moving trains, but the quality is said to be poor because the cameras jerk up and down.  [MORE] [ADD]
     
     
     
  1911  
     
  Jun - The country's fourth  film is made by the British company W. Butcher & son.   They film at the London Missionary Society College of Tiger Kloof and at Serowe. [MORE] [ADD]
     
     
     
  1943  
     
    Miss D Murch, matron at the Lobatse government hospital, shoots a 30-minute colour silent film of British army African Pioneer Corps recruits undergoing training.  [MORE] [ADD]
     
     
     
  1944  
     
    – South African Graham Young is paid £50 per month to tour the country making films to entertain troops.  [MORE] [ADD]
     
     
     
  1947  
     
    Bill Lewis, a professional film-maker from Cape Town shoots a 20-minute silent colour film of the royal visit of King George VI, his wife Elizabeth and their daughters, Princesses Elizabeth and Margaret. [MORE] [ADD] 
     
     
     
  1949  
     
  25/8 - British Movietone Newsreels first relate the story of Ruth Williams, the white British girl who married African prince Seretse Khama.   Their story becomes the improbable basis for Stanley Kramer’s Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner (1967). [MORE] [ADD]
     
     
 
  1953  
     
    Louis Knobel, an employee of South African Information Services, makes a 17-minute film about the Kalahari bushmen called Remnants of a Dying Race. [MORE] [ADD]
     
     
     
  1957  
     
    The Hunters (1957)
 

 

   

The Hunters, a documentary about a 13-day hunting of a giraffe by four members of the Ju’huansi tribesmen in Botswana is released by American filmmakers Robert Gardner and John Marshall[MORE] [ADD]

     
     
     
  1975  
     
  10/10 -

Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Burton re-marry 16 months after divorcing.  [MORE] [ADD] 

     
     
     
  1976  
     
   

Films of Note

   

 

   

Ngaka [MORE] [ADD]

     
     
     
  1980  
     
   

Films of Note

     
   

The Gods Must be Crazy (Jamie Uys) [MORE] [ADD}

   

 

   

N!ai, the Story of a K!ung Woman (John Marshall, Adrienne Miesmer) [MORE] [ADD}

     
     
     
  1989  
     
   

Films of Note

     
   

The Gods Must Be Crazy II (Jamie Uys) [MORE] [ADD]

     

 

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